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School of Education

Archive for the ‘Faculty Spotlight’ Category

Faculty Spotlight Dr. Teresa Little

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Dr. Teresa Little, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Specialized Education Services (SES) department and a recipient of the 2013-2014 Distinguished Career Award from the UNCG School of Education, provides a description of a typical day in the life of a special education teacher, and the qualities and skills one must possess in order to become successful in the field.

T Little 1 

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Faculty Spotlight Holly Downs

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Holly Downs

Holly Downs, Assistant Professor in the Educational Research Methodology department in the UNCG School of Education, provides hands-on experiences to her students in their field of program evaluation, including working with Physicians for Peace in the Dominican Republic.

Holly Downs

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Faculty Spotlight Kathy Matthews

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Kathy Matthews, Professor in the Teacher Education and Higher Education department in UNCG’s School of Education, gives us a daily account of her experiences at the 2013 Rockfish Herpetological Research Experience.

Sunday

It’s the first day of the 2013 Rockfish Herpetological Research Experience (HRE) and I’m excited. What will the students be like? Who are our new teacher participants and will they work well with our groups? What does the weather have in store for us this summer? Will we find ‘new’ species? What will Mr. Aceng, our Indonesian partner think of this classic North Carolina blackwater swamp? Will we catch amphiumas and spotted turtles again this year?

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Faculty Spotlight Erik Hines

Monday, July 15th, 2013

Erik Hines

Erik Hines, Assistant Professor in the Counseling and Educational Development department in the UNCG School of Education, discusses some of the frequent stressors faced by college students, as well as his research on the academic success of African American males in grades K-16.

 

1). What led you to pursue a career in counseling?

I knew when I was 19; I wanted to become a school counselor.  At that time, I loved working with K-12 students and helping young adults reach their potential and figure out how to deal with life issues.  As a result, I knew the field of school counseling was profession for me so I mapped out my educational plan to achieve this goal.  During my master’s program, I developed a passion for solving problems around the gaps in academic achievement for African Americans and how parents can help close them.  Consequently, I pursued a degree in counselor education to learn how to solve this problem through research.

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Faculty Spotlight Jean Kang

Thursday, June 13th, 2013

JKang-avi

Jean Kang, Assistant Professor in the Specialized Education Services department in the UNCG School of Education, discusses the challenges children face transitioning to kindergarten, and what led to her career in Special Education.


1). One of your areas of interest is in a child’s transition to kindergarten – could you discuss the factors that affect this critical stage in a child’s life, and the challenges/opportunities faced by young children with disabilities in today’s schools?

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Faculty Spotlight Ric Luecht

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

r.luecht headshot

Ric Luecht, professor in the Educational Research Methodology department in the School of Education, discusses the importance of assessment engineering in education, and how his experience providing consulting services to outside organizations provides opportunities to his students.

r. luecht graduation

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Faculty Spotlight Silvia Bettez

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Silvia Bettez, professor in the Educational Leadership and Cultural Foundations Department at the UNCG School of Education, discusses her recent publication and the importance of social justice activist teaching.

 

1.    Your first book, But Don’t Call Me White: Mixed Race Women Exposing Nuances of Privilege and Oppression Politics was published a year ago. Could you please talk about your research behind this publication and what inspired you to write on this subject matter?

I address the answer to this question in the opening to my book, so I will share that here: I believe that the more intimately interconnected people feel—the more we take the time to learn about and connect with people across cultural differences—the less separation, segregation, and oppression there will be.  Connecting with others in a way that has the potential to minimize oppression, however, requires striving to understand the complex operations of privilege related to race, class, gender, and sexuality.  My beliefs about the importance of cross-cultural connections, my desire to do work that dismantles oppression, and my personal mixed race identity, led me to seek out life stories by mixed race women, individuals who simultaneously embody racially/ethnically oppressed and privileged identities and thus could speak directly to the challenges of deconstructing hierarchies built on emphasizing inequity in differences.  For this project, I conducted extensive interviews with 16 biracial women in three parts of the United States; each has one White parent and one parent who is a person of color.  I approached this research with a sociological lens searching for meaning related to issues of social justice: What can these women’s stories tell us about how to better communicate cross culturally?  How do their multiple positionalities – of gender, race, class, and sexuality – affect the ways in which they claim agency and are limited by structure? What do their stories reveal about racial politics?

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Faculty Spotlight Nora Bird

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Nora Bird (LIS)

Nora J. Bird

1). You recently presented a workshop on Community College Librarianship – could you please discuss the unique challenges community college librarians face in their daily activities? What are some resources/skills that are useful for community college librarians to have in order to successfully handle those challenges?

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Faculty Spotlight Beverly S. Faircloth, Ph.D.

Friday, February 1st, 2013

Bev Faircloth

Beverly S. Faircloth, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Coordinator Middle Grades Program

Teacher Education Department

Bev Faircloth discusses how the Middle Grades Program at the UNCG School of Education fosters an engaging community of successful teachers

The Middle Grades program at UNCG prepares future teachers for North Carolina licensure in Middle Grades (grades 6-9) including an essential understanding of Middle Grades students and schools; rigorous content-area knowledge (including 2 subject areas); and exemplary teaching practice. The Program is supported by exceptional, well-rounded faculty who devote their time and energy in preparing future middle grade teachers. Middle grades teachers are in high demand in North Carolina (especially in Math and Science), and the Program is doing everything possible to send out quality teachers to the surrounding school districts – many of our alumni come out of the program and are awarded Rookie Teacher of the Year awards by their schools!

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Faculty Spotlight Anne Trice Akers

Friday, June 15th, 2012

5 Questions with Anne Trice Akers, a faculty member in the Department of Library and Information Studies

Akers photo

1)    Q: What was your position at NC State prior to coming to UNCG?
A: At NCSU I was the Director of the College of Education Media Center.  The Media Center is the 21st century version of a curriculum material center and would be the equivalent of the Teaching Resources Center in the SOE.  Before working at NCSU I was a school media/technology coordinator with the Wake County Public School System.

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